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City of Melissa Texas 2015 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 3.26 Chapter 3 Future Land Use Plan Policy 3 Encourage Mixed Use Development Autonomously developed land uses have become the norm since the 1950s along with the increase in suburban development and focus on the automobile. However studies have shown that great neighborhoodsplaces where uses are mixed together such that people can easily access all types of uses to meet all of their needsare more sustainable over time and more long-term value is created. This is the reason that various mixed use land use designations have been recommended within this Future Land Use Plan sustainable neighborhoods with a mixture of uses are what is desired for Melissa. The creation of such neighborhoods will make the City a unique place. National examples of such neighborhoods include the Dupont Circle area in Washington D.C. Queen Anne in Seattle and the Hyde Park area in Austin3-2 . In the DFW Metroplex there are many new areas that show the promise of becoming great neighborhoods including Addison Circle and West Village in Dallas around Cole Avenue and McKinney Avenue. Older areas in the Metroplex that have managed to become great neighborhoods include the communities of Highland Park and University Park. All of these examples provide a diversity of land uses housing types open spaces etc. in a concentrated area such that a cohesive neighborhood is created. LU3.1 The City should ensure that any mixed use development that occurs has special characteristics. Successful mixed use areas old and new alike have key elements that make them feel like special places. These elements while they are not easy to define or outline can be generally identified and include the following. A Defined Character Consideration should be given to the type of atmosphere that is intended to be created such as a village-like character. An Effective Mixture of Uses A mixture of both horizontal and vertical uses should be established and should include uses such as retail residential andor office uses. Buildings in mixed use areas should be at least two stories in height and the ground floor should primarily meet retail standards i.e. a minimum 16 feet in ceiling height good visibility. Maximum Setbacks Maximum setbacks build-to-lines bring building facades closer to the street and to the pedestrian. Maximum setbacks in mixed use areas help to achieve internalized parking. Most cities have minimum setback requirements for other types of development. A Central Gathering Space or Focal Point This type of element not only creates an identity for the development but often establishes an obvious pedestrian focus. A gathering space or focal point can be in many forms including a private open space area plaza fountain or civic building. A recognizable example is the central green space and gazebo in Southlake Town Center. 3-2 Richards James ASLA. Places to Flourish Placemaking that Nourishes Ideas Creativity and Commerce. Thesis for a Master of Landscape Architecture degree - University of Texas at Arlington.