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City of Melissa Texas 2015 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 9.5 Chapter 9 Implementation the related capacity are not available growth would likely not occur anyway and therefore impact fees would not be charged. State County Funding Coordination with state agencies Collin County and the North Central Texas Council of Governments NCTCOG has been recommended in many instances within this Comprehensive Plan for the joint planning and cost sharing of projects. A widely utilized example of state funding is the use of funds allocated by Texas Department of Transportation TxDOT. TxDOT receives funds from the federal government and directly from the state budget that it distributes for roadway construction and maintenance across Texas. There are several roads within Melissa that may be eligible for such funds. Capital improvements funded in cooperation with Collin County generally include roadways park facilities and public buildings9-1. Matching funds from the cities is often a requirement for Collin County funds. The City should research County funding availability specifically for implementation of Plan recommendations related to thoroughfares Chapter 5 parks Chapter 6 and public facilities Chapter 7. Various Types of Bonds The two most widely used types of bonds are general obligation bonds and revenue bonds. General obligation bonds commonly referred to as G.O.s can be described as bonds that are secured by a pledge of the credit and taxing power of the City and must be approved by a voter referendum. Revenue bonds can be described as bonds that are secured by the revenue of the City. Certificates of obligation commonly referred to as C.O.s can be voted on by the City Council without a City-wide electionbond referendum. It should be noted that if Melissa chooses to adopt an impact fee ordinance and bonds have been included in the assessment of impact fees funds derived from impact fees could be used to retire bonds. Community Development Block Grant Program CDBG CDBG grants can be used to revitalize neighborhoods expand affordable housing and economic opportunities and improve community facilities and services. A minimum percentage of all CBDG grant funds allocated to a city must be devoted to programs and activities that benefit low- and moderate-income individuals. Cities can use grants toward a number of actions including reconstructing or rehabilitating housing building public infrastructure i.e. capital facilities such as streets water and sewer systems providing public services to young people seniors or disabled persons and assisting low-income homebuyers. 7-1 Collin County Website The 2003 Bond Program Public Information link from the Departments link from the homepage. Website www.co.collin.tx.us.