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City of Melissa Texas 2015 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 8.13 Chapter 8 City Center Concept Plan Ornamental Parks Ornamental areas are shown on the City Center Concept Plan Map Figure 8-1 within each of the three areas. The importance of public space in relation to the population feeling ownership of an area has been previously discussed herein. The type of ornamental areas envisioned are those that help create an identity for the Town Center Old Town and the TOD and that provide a special place for pedestrians. Ornamental areas can be any number of things including a central green space plaza gazebo fountain or splash pad for children etc. Image 17. Creation of a series of ornamental parks that link the City Center areas will project the concept that each area is a special place in Melissa. Ten Principles for Creating Successful Squares 1. Image and Identity Creating a square that becomes the most significant place in a city--that gives identity to whole communities--is a huge challenge but meeting this challenge is absolutely necessary if great civic squares are to return. 2. Attractions and Destinations Any great square has a variety of smaller places within it to appeal to various people. Creation of 10 good places each with 10 things to do offers a full program for a successful square. 3. Amenities A square should feature amenities that make it comfortable for people to use. Examples include benches waste receptacles lighting public art. Amenities will help establish a convivial setting for social interaction. 4. Flexible Design The use of a square changes during the course of the day week and year. To respond to these natural fluctuations flexibility needs to be built in to the design of the space. 5. Seasonal Strategy Great squares change with the seasons. Skating rinks outdoor cafs markets art and sculpture help adapt the use of the space from one season to the next. 6. Access To be successful a square needs to be easy to get to. The best squares are always easily accessible by foot Surrounding streets are narrow crosswalks are well marked lights are timed for pedestrians not vehicles traffic moves slowly and transit stops are located nearby. A square surrounded by lanes of fast- moving traffic will be cut off from pedestrians and deprived of its most essential element people. 7. The Inner Square the Outer Square Frederick Law Olmsteds idea The streets and sidewalks around a square greatly affect its accessibility and use as do the buildings that surround it. Imagine a square fronted on each side by 15-foot blank walls versus that same square situated next to a public library the library doors open right onto the square people sit outside and read on the steps maybe the childrens reading hour is held outside on the square. An active welcoming outer square is essential to the well-being of the inner square. 8. Reaching Out Like an Octopus Just as important as the edge of a square is the way that streets sidewalks and ground floors of adjacent buildings lead into it. Like the tentacles of an octopus extending into the surrounding neighborhood the influence of a good square starts at least a block away. 9. The Central Role of Management The best places are ones that people return to time and time again. The only way to achieve this is through a management plan that keeps the square safe and lively. 10. Diverse Funding Sources Sponsorships from private entities and partnerships can help manage these special areas. For example property associations can supplement public funding. Adapted from an article of the same name on the Project for Public Spaces website. Image 17 All 3 pictures