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City of Melissa Texas 2015 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 6.1 Chapter 6 Parks and Trails Plan Introduction A vital component of an urban area is the space devoted to satisfying active and passive community recreational needs. The quantity of this space and its distribution within the population generally indicates the quality of the local park and recreation services. Furthermore all these spaces collectively are considered to be elements that enhance and contribute to the quality of life found in the community. The purpose of this element of the Comprehensive Plan is to examine and analyze existing park and recreation spaces and facilities to identify issues related to present and future community needs and to make recommendations on how the Citys park and recreation facilities can be integrated into a cohesive system. The service area for this Parks and Trails Plan is the entire City and this chapter is supported by the demographic and socio-economic data within Chapter 1 Existing Conditions Analysis. This Parks and Trails Plan establishes criteria for park types evaluates existing facilities provides a comparative analysis of Melissas park system to accepted park standards and identifies demand-based needs that Melissa will need to address in the short-term 1 to 5 years as well as in the long-term 5 to 10 years. Generally the timeframe for this Parks and Trails Plan is 10 years. This Parks and Trails Plan should be considered an update of the Citys Parks and Recreation Master Plan which was prepared by the Parks Board in November of 2004. Goals and Objectives This Parks and Trails Plan endorses the following goals and objectives from the previously adopted Parks and Recreation Master Plan. Goal 1. Provide parks and common open spaces adequate in size distribution and conditions to serve all citizens. Objectives a. Include within the entire park system a combination of pocket parks neighborhood parks lineargreenbelt parks i.e. trails and community parks some of which may be HOA parks. b. Utilize alternative sources of land such as school sites other City departments vacant or under- utilized land existing street right-of-way and joint CityCounty purchases or leases to lessen land acquisition costs. c. Develop a visible and accessible lineargreenbelt park system through layout and design of the surrounding roadway network. d. Work with the appropriate governmental and other organizations to coordinate parkland acquisition with long range growth and development planning. Frederick Law Olmstead the man considered to be the father of landscape architecture in this country advocated the concept that parks recreation areas and public open spaces should be planned as integrated systems so that the components could function in conjunction with one another. Source Alexander Garvin December 2000 Parks Recreation and Open Space A Twenty-First Century Agenda American Planning Association Planning Advisory Service Report Number 497498 p.13.