Page 1
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
Page 5
Page 6
Page 7
Page 8
Page 9
Page 10
Page 11
Page 12
Page 13
Page 14
Page 15
Page 16
Page 17
Page 18
Page 19
Page 20
Page 21
Page 22
Page 23
Page 24
Page 25
Page 26
Page 27
Page 28
Page 29
Page 30
Page 31
Page 32
Page 33
Page 34
Page 35
Page 36
Page 37
Page 38
Page 39
Page 40
Page 41
Page 42
Page 43
Page 44
Page 45
Page 46
Page 47
Page 48
Page 49
Page 50
Page 51
Page 52
Page 53
Page 54
Page 55
Page 56
Page 57
Page 58
Page 59
Page 60
Page 61
Page 62
Page 63
Page 64
Page 65
Page 66
Page 67
Page 68
Page 69
Page 70
Page 71
Page 72
Page 73
Page 74
Page 75
Page 76
Page 77
Page 78
Page 79
Page 80
Page 81
Page 82
Page 83
Page 84
Page 85
Page 86
Page 87
Page 88
Page 89
Page 90
Page 91
Page 92
Page 93
Page 94
Page 95
Page 96
Page 97
Page 98
Page 99
Page 100
Page 101
Page 102
Page 103
Page 104
Page 105
Page 106
Page 107
Page 108
Page 109
Page 110
Page 111
Page 112
Page 113
Page 114
Page 115
Page 116
Page 117
Page 118
Page 119
Page 120
Page 121
Page 122
Page 123
Page 124
Page 125
Page 126
Page 127
Page 128
Page 129
Page 130
Page 131
Page 132
Page 133
Page 134
Page 135
Page 136
Page 137
Page 138
Page 139
Page 140
Page 141
Page 142
Page 143
Page 144
Page 145
Page 146
Page 147
Page 148
Page 149
Page 150
Page 151
Page 152
Page 153
Page 154
Page 155
Page 156
Page 157
Page 158
Page 159
Page 160
Page 161
Page 162
Page 163
Page 164
Page 165
Page 166
Page 167
Page 168
Page 169
Page 170
Page 171
Page 172
Page 173
Page 174
Page 175
Page 176
Page 177
Page 178
Page 179
Page 180
Page 181
Page 182
Page 183
Page 184
Page 185
Page 186
Page 187
Page 188
Page 189
Page 190
Page 191
Page 192
Page 193
Page 194
Page 195
Page 196
Page 197
Page 198
Page 199
Page 200
Page 201
Page 202
Page 203
Page 204
Page 205
Page 206
Page 207
Page 208
Page 209
Page 210
Page 211
Page 212
Page 213
Page 214
Page 215
Page 216
Page 217
Page 218
Page 219
Page 220
Page 221
Page 222
Page 223
Page 224
Page 225
Page 226
Page 227
Page 228
Page 229
Page 230
Page 231
Page 232
City of Melissa Texas 2015 Comprehensive Plan Update Page 5.11 Chapter 5 Transportation Plan Alternative Transportation Options One of the objectives of this Transportation Plan is to put forth concepts of transportation options that will provide an alternative to the automobile specifically transit and pedestrianbicycle modes. The major challenge to meeting this objective is putting forth these concepts in a way that make such alternatives realistic and convenient for the citizens of Melissa to use. Transit and trail concepts and why they should be proactively pursued by the City are discussed below and policies that support these concepts are outlined within Transportation Policy 2. Transit Opportunities The North Central Texas Council of Governments NCTCOG has completed a Regional Rail Corridor Study that examines how the current rail system generally operated by Dallas Area Rapid Transit could be expanded to meet the future anticipated travel demand in the Metroplex. The NCTCOGs study revealed that with the amount of ridership expected a connected regional rail system could have the effect of adding on additional freeway lane in each direction to some of the most congested highways and tollways in North Central Texas. The DART rail has recently been expanded as far north as Plano and there are plans to extend the line further north to address the increasing traffic along U.S. Highway 75. The fact that Melissa has a railroad line through the center of the City makes the eventual expansion of rail services to and through Melissa an increased possibility. The easements associated with these railroad lines can be used for light rail or commuter rail lines. In anticipation of an eventual light rail or commuter rail line through Melissa a proposed location for a transit station has been established refer to the Transportation Plan Map Figure 5-6. One of the major factors in transit ridership is convenience specifically in terms of 1 accessibility to and from the transit stop itself 2 accessibility to other locations in the Metroplex and 3 reliability of the transit system. Meaning that in order for people to use transit it is not enough simply to establish the transit system and transit stop the transit mode must be as convenient or Admittedly a transition to patterns in which walking bicycling and public transportation will be effective alternatives for large percentages of residents will take 20 to 30 years or moreCommunities need not be completely transformed before they begin to attract attention as more livable spaces. Simply getting the process in motion backed up by long-term plans and firm public commitments may encourage potential new residents to become pioneers. William H. Lucy David L. Phillips. Suburban Decline The Next Urban Crisis. Issues in Science and Technology Online website. The distance a person will walk and the mode of transport he or she will use are strongly affected by the walking environment. Real and even perceived delays and inconveniences such as lack of sidewalks inadequate signage dangerous walkways poor appearance and factors that create a sense of insecurity can cause potential riders to choose use of their personal automobiles Sean OSullivan John Morrall. Walking Distances to and from Light-Rail Transit Stations. Transportation Research Record 1538.